Lifestyle


Disney updates content warning for racism in classic films

A content advisory notice for racism in classic Disney films, in place since last year, has been updated with a strengthened message. When played on the Disney+ streaming service, films such as Dumbo, Peter Pan and Jungle Book now flash up with a warning about stereotypes. "This programme includes negative depictions and/or mistreatment of people or cultures," the warning says. "These stereotypes were wrong then and are wrong now." The message adds that rather than remove the content, "we want to acknowledge its harmful impact, learn from it and spark conversation to create a more inclusive future together". Other films to carry the warning are The Aristocats, which shows a cat in "yellow-face" p...

Why embracing change is the key to a good life

How we handle change is the essence of our existence and the key to happiness, particularly in our current times of uncertainty. In the first of a new series, The Art of Living, Lindsay Baker explores the philosophy of change. Article continues below “Life is flux,” said the philosopher Heraclitus. The Greek philosopher pointed out in 500 BC that everything is constantly shifting, and becoming something other to what it was before. Like a river, life flows ever onwards, and while we may step from the riverbank into the river, the waters flowing over our feet will never be the same waters that flowed even one moment before. Heraclitus concluded that since the very nature of life is change, to resist this natural flow was to resist the very ...

Why ‘Dinner Table Syndrome’ is getting worse for deaf people

The ‘Dinner Table Syndrome’ phenomenon leaves deaf people out of the discourse. In a world of remote work, the problem is getting even worse. Article continues below Before the pandemic, my husband and I would often meet our friends for a beer at the weekend. For many, grabbing a drink with friends is the epitome of a relaxing evening. But for deaf people in a hearing crowd, a pub can be a perfect storm of bad lighting, loud background noise and full mouths that make communication difficult. Sometimes, I enjoy myself and my friends, and I try to ensure that I can understand the conversation. But sometimes I am not in the mood for this work. I stare at my beer, let my eyes glaze over. I am there, but not there. Deaf people have a term for...

What is a ‘life of luxury’ now?

Luxury as a concept has always seemed inherently rooted in materialism. Over the centuries it has been rare, precious, innovative, opulently extravagant, or even starkly minimalist, but it has always involved the owning of beautiful, often superfluous, things. The exhibition, Luxes, which opens at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris in October, explores this multi-faceted history. It also questions whether, in a world where natural resources are declining and over-consumption is having a catastrophic effect on our environment, it may be possible to move towards a more meaningful definition of luxury, one that is in tune not only with nature but our true selves. Although the exhibition was conceived pre-pandemic, these issues seem more re...

The return of Europe’s largest beasts

I stumble past long grass, whipping mosquitoes away from my legs, as I enter a clearing. “The deer have been eating all the young trees here, so they haven’t managed to grow,” my guide tells me, gesturing to the shrubbery in front of us. We carry on walking and the trees suddenly become taller and denser. “It looks like they don’t graze here as much,” he says. “Probably because there’s dead wood on the ground. It makes it harder for them to get away if there are wolves in the area.” “Is that a good thing?” I ask. “It’s neither good nor bad,” he replies. “It’s just what nature intends.” My guide is Stefan Schwill, one of Germany’s leading proponents of rewilding. This method of conservation aims to let large areas of land return to wilde...

Germany puts first auto boss on trial over 'dieselgate' fraud

Five years after "dieselgate" emissions cheating revelations rocked the car industry, ex-Audi CEO Rupert Stadler on Wednesday became the first top executive to stand trial in Germany. Stadler, 57, appeared before the Munich district court to answer charges of fraud, falsifying certifications and false advertising. He wore a face mask as a precaution against the coronavirus as he arrived but then took it off in court. With him in the dock are former Audi and Porsche manager Wolfgang Hatz and two Audi engineers, all charged with fraud. German car giant Volkswagen -- whose subsidiaries include Porsche, Audi, Skoda and Seat -- admitted in September 2015 that it had installed software to rig emissions in 11 million diesel vehicles ...

Rio postpones world-famous carnival over Covid-19

Rio de Janeiro's world-famous carnival parades became the latest casualty of the coronavirus pandemic Thursday as officials announced they were indefinitely postponing the February 2021 edition, with Brazil still reeling from Covid-19. Rio's carnival, the world's biggest, is an epidemiologist's nightmare in a pandemic: an extended festival of tightly packed crowds dancing through the streets and flocking to the city's iconic "Sambadrome" for massive parades featuring scantily clad dancers, small armies of drummers and all-night partying at close quarters. The event draws millions of tourists from around Brazil and the world to the beachside city each year. Rio's elite samba schools, which typically spend the entire year prepari...

Former Ferrari chief to replace Carey as F1 CEO: reports

Former Ferrari team principal Stefano Domenicali is set to become the new CEO of Formula One after leaving the Italian team earlier than expected, media reports said Wednesday. The 55-year-old Italian is to replace Chase Carey, who has been in charge since US group Liberty Media took over the sport in 2017, according to the BBC and Autosport. While Formula One officials would not confirm the appointment of Domenicali, senior sources in F1 told the BBC it was a done deal. The news -- which will also see American Carey remain as chairman in some form -- has been communicated to the team bosses. Domenicali took over at Ferrari from Jean Todt, now the FIA president, at the end of 2007 and tasted immediate success when Ferrari won the 2008 c...

How I’m Getting Richer Every Day

I’m not hungry for money. Compared to several years ago, when I had less money, I still have the same life. It’s a rich life. I wake up, drink my freshly brewed coffee, read a good book, and then start working until about 3 or 4 in the afternoon. Then, I put on my shorts and a t-shirt and start working out. Sometimes I listen to music during my workouts, and sometimes I don’t. After working out, I have dinner with my family. We watch a TV show or movie after we eat. And then, I get back to working or reading. You see, it doesn’t take much money to live a good life. Benjamin Graham, one of the most respected investors of all time, once told his apprentice: “Money isn’t making that much difference in how you and I live. We’re both going d...

10 Lustrous Facts About Gold

Gold’s symbol on the periodic table, Au, comes from its Latin name aurum, which means “glowing dawn.” This metal’s tantalizing yellow color and shining exterior has made gold a prized element in jewelry and treasured objects for thousands of years—but, amazingly, all of the gold that has ever been refined could melt down into a single cube measuring 70 feet per side. Read on for more opulent facts. 1. GOLD WAS PROBABLY THE FIRST METAL USED BY HUMANS. Gold, number 79 on the periodic table, is almost twice as heavy as iron, but it’s incredibly malleable—and for that reason, it was probably the first metal humans ever wrought. The oldest known worked-gold artifacts, from the Thracian civilization in present-day Bulgaria, date back 4000 years;...

Why the rich get richer and the poor get poorer

There are both ethical and political reasons for wanting to address the growing gap between rich and poor, according to experts ranging from economists and political scientists to social workers and activists. The perception that a few people are getting rich at the expense of the rest of us is fuelling a backlash, from the Occupy movement that began in 2011 to the austerity protests in Europe, to the worker walkouts in support of a higher minimum wage last year in the U.S. The fear is that the world is developing what one expert calls a "Downton Abbey economy", with a small wealthy class – the 1 per cent – and a large class of poor workers. Meanwhile, the middle class is being squeezed with higher prices and stagnant wages, for...

Boris Johnson says super-rich are ‘put-upon minority’ like homeless people and Irish travellers

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson has told people to stop “bashing” the super-rich, comparing them to hard-pressed minorities like the homeless, Irish travellers or ex-gang members. Mr Johnson accused “everyone from the Archbishop of Canterbury to Nick Clegg” of bullying the group he defined as “zillionaires” – and said the most rich of all should receive “automatic knighthoods”. The comments come from an article Mr Johnson wrote for the Daily Telegraph, and appear just a day after the BBC’s The Revolution Will Be Televised programme criticised the capital’s mayor for his “career in show business” – confronting him and asking when he would move into politics. Mr Johnson said the rich deserve our “humble and hearty thanks” for their contr...